Often, some of the most antique Coca-Cola machines are not much more than a metal box with the recognizable Coca-Cola script logo emblazoned across it. Essentially these were ice boxes designed specifically to be stocked with bottles of Coke and ice. Glascock was one manufacturer of such early vending units. After these early vintage Coca-Cola machines that weren't much more than a glorified ice-box, came a refrigerated unit that didn't need ice. While it did have some advantages over its predecessor, such as a cleaner operation without the ice, it did have to be near an electric outlet and could require costly fixes. Coin operated vending machines came next in common use and popularity, although some were seen as early as the end of the 19th Century. The history of coin operated machines actually goes back to the 1st Century when a coin resulted in vending holy water. One type of coin operated machine had a glass door through which bottles were seen and, after a coin was provided, a customer could pull out one bottle. If you weren't careful, you might not pull properly and would lose your coin. The next type of machine dispensed the bottles one by one and was less likely to jam or malfunction. A popular maker of the early vintage Coca-Cola machine was Vendorlator in California.