Most early coin machines were nickel machines, and you needed an actual nickel coin. As they became more sophisticated, some could make change, at first only from a dime, and eventually for other coins and, in modern times, even for dollar bills. For most, changing the price was pretty much impossible. Bottle vending machines were supplanted when canned soft drinks became available in the 1960's. Cans were less likely to break than bottles, chilled faster and needed no bottle openers or cap receptacles. Over ninety percent of the world recognizes the Coca Cola logo, and collectors all over the world add any object containing this popular logo to their collections every days. Coca Cola memorabilia has seemed to become extraordinarily valuable even with the introduction of even new present day collectibles. Coca Cola memorabilia consists of specialty items that include beanie babies, plush toys, tins, playing cards, pens, pencils, phone cards, dish ware, matchbooks, thimbles, clothing, signs, trays, patches, and so much more. The values of these items are determined by their availability and the condition they are in. The use of a grading scale was established in 1965 by Sheldon Goldstein as the Coca Cola Collector's Standard and has been used for over four decades. With bottles and cans they should always be full unless it is other wise specified.