Coin operated vending machines came next in common use and popularity, although some were seen as early as the end of the 19th Century. The history of coin operated machines actually goes back to the 1st Century when a coin resulted in vending holy water. One type of coin operated machine had a glass door through which bottles were seen and, after a coin was provided, a customer could pull out one bottle. If you weren't careful, you might not pull properly and would lose your coin. The next type of machine dispensed the bottles one by one and was less likely to jam or malfunction. A popular maker of the early vintage Coca-Cola machine was Vendorlator in California. In the mid 20th Century they had a large market share. The Vendorlator 33 had a strange top opening and was quite small holding only 33 bottles. Other models were bigger than refrigerators. Vendorlator made machines for Pepsi as well, but rival Vendo made only Coca-Cola machines. Most early coin machines were nickel machines, and you needed an actual nickel coin.